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Magic Attic Club Holiday 1998 Catalog

Magic Attic Club Holiday 1998 Catalog

Magic Attic Club dolls were produced by four different companies between 1994 and 2004. They were the first competitors to the American Girl dolls but never realized their full potential. For more information on Magic Attic, visit the Just Magic site.

Catalog Illustrations for Mam’selle Outfits for Sindy, Paul and Patch (1966)

Catalog Illustrations for Mam’selle Outfits for Sindy, Paul and Patch (1966)

Mam’selle Gear Get-Ups were a separate line from Pedigree’s regular clothing for their Sindy, Paul and Patch fashion dolls. These six catalog pages from 1966 show illustrations of these hard to find outfits.

Sindy Outfits

Paul Outfits

Patch Outfits

Mam’selle Doll Accessory Boxed Sets (1966)

Mam’selle Doll Accessory Boxed Sets (1966)

The Pedigree Toy Box catalog for 1966 shows a page of boxed “jewellery and nic-nacs” sets (what in the US would be called accessories) for dolls.

The jewelry includes a brooch which appears to be a deer, two pairs of earrings (one balls and one possibly cat heads), a tiara and three pendants (a ball, a heart and an abstract shape).

In the 1960s most little girls were expected to become housewives and mothers when they grew up. These sets helped teach the skills they would need. The Housework Set includes a broom, bucket, dishpan and scrub brush, dust pan and brush, and an apron. The Washing Line Set includes a clothesline, clothespins and box of laundry soap. The Baby Doll Feeding Set has a bottle, brush, spoon, pacifier and bib.
Beauty was important, too. The Brush, Comb and Mirror Set helped keep dolly’s hair neat. The Toilet Set included toothpaste and toothbrush, Lux soap, wash cloth and an unidentified bar of something. (If you know what that is, please leave a comment.) The Accessory Set included a purse, belt, sunglasses, something with a floral pattern (scarf maybe?) and the same abstract pendant sold in the Pendants set. The Dolls Make Up Kit included a range of play cosmetics to try out on your doll. Hopefully no dolls were permanently scarred! It should be noted that this is the only set on the page that doesn’t have the Pedigree name on it – it was made by Leichner.
14″ First Lady Dolls by Madame Alexander – First Series (1976-78)

14″ First Lady Dolls by Madame Alexander – First Series (1976-78)

There’s also a video version of this post here.

The Alexander Doll Company issued six series of 14” First Lady dolls beginning in 1976 and ending in 1990, depicting the wives of the US Presidents. The first series, available from 1976 through 1978, included Martha Washington, Abigail Adams, Martha Randolph, Dolley Madison, Elizabeth Monroe and Louisa Adams. The dolls are not portraits of the actual women, and Madame Alexander used creative license in selecting the hair and eye colors of the dolls. They are made of rigid vinyl, with rooted hair and sleep eyes with brush lashes. They are jointed at the neck, shoulders and hips, and wear beautifully made outfits. In addition to the outfit pieces described, each doll wears white stockings.

Martha Dandridge Custis Washington was the wife of George Washington, America’s first President. She was a young widow with two toddlers when she married Washington in 1759. Although the doll has light blonde hair, the real Martha was a brunette. She is remembered today as a warm and gracious hostess who treasured her privacy. Martha Washington wears a silver and taupe brocade gown trimmed with champagne lace and ivory braid, with an attached lace stole and a lace mob cap. Her white cotton and net petticoat and pantalettes are trimmed with pink satin ribbon and white lace. She carries a brown velveteen bag adorned with an ivory lace motif. Pink satin shoes and a graduated “pearl” necklace complete her ensemble.
Abigail Smith Adams, wife of John Adams, got her feet wet by being the Vice President’s wife (now sometimes called Second Lady) before becoming First Lady when her husband was elected President. In 1825 she also became the mother of a President when her son John Quincy Adams was elected. Her admonition to her husband to “remember the ladies” as he worked with the Continental Congress to build a new nation is still quoted today. Abigail Adams wears a long sleeved royal blue satin gown with a delicate leaf print, with white lace at the cuffs. Her white lace shawl is attached at the neckline and held in place with a rhinestone pin at her bodice. Her white cotton and net petticoat and pantalettes are trimmed in white lace and pale blue satin ribbon. She wears a blue velvet ribbon in her hair and black velveteen shoes. A graduated “pearl” necklace provides a finishing touch.
Martha Jefferson Randolph was the daughter of the third American President, Thomas Jefferson. She acted as his occasional hostess due to the death of her mother several years before. She and her husband had twelve children – her son, James, was the first child born in the White House, in 1806. Known as Patsy to her family, Martha took devoted care of her father in his declining years. Martha Randolph wears a short sleeved pale pink taffeta gown with an ivory lace panel down the front. Her pink taffeta petticoat and pantalettes are trimmed with pink satin ribbon and white lace. She wears a pink organdy wrap around her head and a long black cape trimmed in fancy brocade ribbon. A graduated “pearl” necklace and pink satin shoes complete her outfit.
Dolley Payne Todd Madison was the wife of America’s fourth President, James Madison. She was the first First Lady to embrace a public role, and helped to found a home for young orphaned girls. When the British burned Washington during the War of 1812, she refused to evacuate the White House until Gilbert Stuart’s portrait of George Washington was removed from the wall and secured. Dolley Madison wears a sleeveless champagne satin dressed flocked with silver glitter in a floral pattern, and decorated with champagne and silver metallic braid. She wears a matching long coat and an ivory organdy head wrap. Her white cotton petticoat and pantalettes are trimmed with white lace and pink satin ribbon. Champagne satin shoes provide the finishing touch.
Elizabeth Kortright Monroe was only seventeen years old when she married the future fifth President of the United States, James Monroe. Due to her frail health, her oldest daughter often assumed the duties of hostess at the White House. Elizabeth Monroe wears a long sleeved gold and pink satin brocade gown, trimmed in satin ribbon and lace. Her white cotton and net petticoat and pantalettes are trimmed with white satin ribbon and lace. A lace shawl attached to a long brocade panel at her back is held in place with a goldtone bow pin at her waist. She wears a rhinestone tiara and a rhinestone pendant necklace on a goldtone chain. Champagne colored satin shoes complete her ensemble.

Louisa Catherine Johnson Adams, wife of John Quincy Adams, was born in England, to a British mother and American father. She wrote music and poetry, and played the harp. She followed her husband in his diplomatic travels around the world, once crossing Europe by coach in the winter to join him.
Louisa Adams wears a short sleeved white satin gown decorated with white and silver metallic braid, and ruched bands of tulle. Her white taffeta and net petticoat and pantalettes are decorated with gathered white lace. She wears graduated “pearl” necklace and a cluster of rosebuds in her hair.

Each doll’s gown was tagged First Ladies, with her name. They also came with a little booklet wrist tag, with color photos and descriptions of all six dolls.
This series has been described as having two different face molds, the Mary Ann face, shown here on the Abigail Adams and Elizabeth Monroe dolls, and what’s sometimes called the Martha face mold, shown here on Louisa Adams and Martha Randolph. The Martha mold appears to be the 1960s Elise mold, but in a smaller size. Elise is a 17” doll. What looks to me like a third mold, is this one, shown on Martha Washington and Dolley Madison. This appears to be a slightly larger version of the Nancy Drew face that Alexander used a lot of in the 1970s. Nancy Drew is a 12” doll. Here I’ll show you the three different faces. What do you think? Are there three, or just two?